Search

Loading...

About Me

My Photo
Funmi Iyanda
Lagos, Nigeria
Funmi Iyanda is a multi award-winning producer and broadcast journalist. She is the CEO of Ignite Media and Executive Director of Creation Television
View my complete profile

My Twitter Feed

Powered by Blogger.

TWF Videos

Loading...
There was an error in this gadget
Thursday, October 08, 2009

The danger of a single story

This requires no lengthy explanations. Just watch and comment but let's talk about aspects of it tomorrow.

9 comments:

StandTall-The Activist said...

Thanks Funmi for sharing this link. Chimamanda is truly intelligent!

Chisom said...

What I find amazing about "the danger of a single story" is the artistry of the speech/talk. Chimamanda made a point we all know and are very much aware of, but she has put it in an inspirational and mind-motivating manner. This is an art that God has truly blessed her with.

Nigeria Health Watch said...

Watched in Oxford as she delivered the talk....pin-drop silence then standing ovation - read my account here:
http://www.multiplestories.org/2009/07/chimamanda-tedglobal.html

Dapxin said...

Interesting streams of questions and rationale by her...on a single story.

2nd time of watching her speak in public; I quite like the seeming care-free, kid-like style with which she delivers...

I hope I do get the time to read her book, and maybe I can see exactly the buzz in her writiing....

Her conclusions are also very interesting; I do admire the subtle ways in which she struck the right cords regarding power / western stereotype etc....

Eniola said...

I Listened to this today and actually had to post it on my facebook profile. It was beautifully read and every Nigerian can associate with the things she said. I've never seen any of your shows as I’m not in Nigeria but recently I stumbled upon some on you tube, and boy was I impressed!! You did a good job with the show and your Charity program. I would love to be a part of that, (though might not be able to do much financially), but I do believe strongly that every one at one time or the other needs to pay their dues to the society that made them what/who they are(in a good way). Please reply or have one of your PR people reply as to what I can do to contribute to youth development in Nigeria (especially children).

Thanks

Eniola Olooto
anystars90@hotmail.com

Myne Whitman said...

That was a beautiful presention by CA. Kudos.

Anonymous said...

I loved it Funmi and in so many ways, I find myself a victim of the single story reading. Often thinking, analyzing and finalyzing based on a single story. I particularly loved how she outlined Nigeria's flaws as well as her many beauties. Well spoken. Lets broaden our minds, shall we? Well done CNA!

Uche

Rock of Ages said...

I must commend the literary genius of Chimamanda, and am proud of our common Nigerian heritage. I decided to emigrate from Nigeria about 15 years ago for fear of losing my sanity due to the perennial power outage, random armed robbery attacks, brazen and unbridled corruption in virtually all facets of public and private endeavours I was involved in for 10 years after my graduation from the Law School and enrolment into the Nigerian Bar.

During those 10 years of my Nigerian working experience, I was Legal Adviser to Government, Merchant and Commercial Banks, as well as in the Private Bar.

When I desired to start a family, it dawned on me that the Nigeria in which I grew up with virtually constant power supply, free and qualitative public education up to University level had become history. My mother was a primary school teacher while my father was a civil servant, yet they were able to raise 6 children with University education with their meagre earnings. This can only be a dream in today's Nigeria. Armed robbery was a strange phenomenon during my childhood because it was exclusively engaged in by "dare-devils" like Doctor Oyenusi and Mighty Joe. Today, armed robbers are as educated and articulate as participants in this blog. Our country which was once the supplier of electric power to neighouring West African countries in addition to her citizenry, is now the leading consumer of power generating sets in the world. Our roads are in a sorry state of repair, making short-distance journeys seem like intercontinental travels. How about the unnecessary loss of lives to preventable road mishaps, shameful medicare, criminal gangsters (otherwise known as cultists). We know the rest of the story...

I have no doubt in the ability of the individual Nigerian, having come across Nigerians of distinction in practically every profession of reckon around the world. My worry is that the average "Nigerian at Home" has accepted the retardation of our 50 year-old nation as normal. The average "Nigerian Abroad" is proud of her heritage yet depressed by the sorry state of our nation. Our people deserve better, considering the wealth and talent that we are blessed with. We are among the 30 wealthiest nations in the world yet our people are among the 30 poorest in the world.

I have come to the conclusion that freedom is of the mind and not the body. We may seem to be free from colonialism and imperialism, but until the power to change our destiny lies in our hands by way of our votes, we are not free. Our nation has been held hostage by a criminal ruling cabal for decades - that is our single story.

Nsheuko said...

I have watch several times and it sill moves me every time. Chimamanda is truly smart and inspiriting. She is the future of African literature; she is the next generation we can count on.